HOW TO BUILD A WOODEN TABLE - HOW TO BUILD


How To Build A Wooden Table - End Tables Living Room - Counter Top Dining Table.



How To Build A Wooden Table





how to build a wooden table






    wooden table
  • A table is a type of furniture comprising an open, flat surface supported by a base or legs. It may be used to hold articles such as food or papers at a convenient or comfortable height when sitting, and is therefore often used in conjunction with chairs.





    how to
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations

  • Providing detailed and practical advice

  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.

  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic





    build
  • physique: constitution of the human body

  • Commission, finance, and oversee the building of (something)

  • build up: form or accumulate steadily; "Resistance to the manager's plan built up quickly"; "Pressure is building up at the Indian-Pakistani border"

  • Construct (something, typically something large) by putting parts or material together over a period of time

  • Incorporate (something) and make it a permanent part of a structure, system, or situation

  • construct: make by combining materials and parts; "this little pig made his house out of straw"; "Some eccentric constructed an electric brassiere warmer"











how to build a wooden table - KidKraft Waterfall




KidKraft Waterfall Mountain Train Set and Table


KidKraft Waterfall Mountain Train Set and Table



Learning while playing is fun with KidKraft's new wooden Train Table with Three Bins and 120 Piece Mountain Train Set. KidKraft's train table is kid-sized for hours of creative play. With a wide, generous play table, our train table has several unique features including: * Three durable red plastic bins that slid under the table for effortless storage * Special T-molded edges to prevent chipping * Curved edges for safety * Easy to assemble * Sturdy construction * Silk-screened landscaped play board with reversible flip side * 1 ?" lip to keep toys on the play table. Also included is KidKraft's popular Mountain Train Set. Much more than a simple set of tracks, this brightly colored wooden transportation system has abundant opportunities for creativity and imaginative play. With 120 durable pieces, the set consists of : * Cars, trains, signs, trees, people, and town buildings. * Mountain pieces to drive trains over and through create different levels of play. * Large play board with silk-screened landscaping and scenery * Compatible with wooden Thomas and Brio tracks and train sets. Measures 48.75"L x 34.5"W x 48.75"H.










85% (10)





Sur le Parc on Florida Avenue




Sur le Parc on Florida Avenue





Fenced and on steel I-beams, this house, worn and tattered with age and weather, is Cocoa's oldest building.

'Sur le Parc' or 'By the Park' was constructed in 1888 for Miss Julia Roberts. And before you ask - she's no relation to the Julia Roberts of "Pretty Woman" fame. Whether this Julia Roberts was pretty or not doesn't matter in this story. Anyways...

Julia Roberts was a busy lady. She was Cocoa's dressmaker and ran her business into the 1910s or so.

Well, this place was located not just out of the back door of the Antique Mall that my Mom and I worked at for nearly a year. For many months I wondered what would happen to this building, as I would stand there and watch its tin roof flail uselessly in the wind and watch the poor building decay and decay.

One day, months ago, this building suddenly disappeared, but I had known about its disappearance beforehand. I read an article in Florida Today about its moving one day and was amazed. I also realized we would be working at the shop not more than two days after the building was moved.

I anxiously anticipated that day, as I wanted to see what old, familiar Delannoy Avenue would look like without old familiar Sur le Parc.

We got there and I was disappointed. I knew I would be, but Delannoy isn't the same without this building. It's still in Cocoa. They only moved this building four blocks to the west, but still. It LOOKED right on Delannoy.

So we get there and a downed palm tree (from moving the building) blocked our way. I look around and notice the site is covered with artifacts. They're everywhere. An old tea kettle there, and an old table leg over there. I was distraught. Over what most people would call old junk! I wanted to pick up these things - some of them quite delicate - and protect them from the elements.

But Mom said, "No, you don't know who owns this property. You can't steal them."

Well stealing was not what I had in mind. This was rescuing things. Rescuing Cocoa history. This was important. I know I have to do the right thing - which I wanted to do, but there was still that other part of me that wanted to immediately get those artifacts.

Hey, what also was important was the fact that there was a bunch of old beadboard in a trashpile. A bunch of usable beadboard. Beadboard the Heritage Foundation could use in the Clifton Schoolhouse.

So, reluctantly. Very reluctantly - with trepidation, in fact. I went on to the shop and we opened up. We were open fifteen minutes and then I had to give in. Especially when one of the dealers that came into the shop for a while and I talked about the situation.

She said: "Well, you don't want the trash pick-up people to come and take that beadboard if you want it, do you? What about you just lean it against the back of the building. They'll see them leaned up and know someone wants to do something with them."

And that did it for me. I went outside and started to work - in my good clothes too. I, in brown, formal shoes (I always wear brown dress shoes) and three layers of clothing - in April or so -- was digging through the wood pile and setting the beadboard against the back of the building and setting the old water kettle with the wood, along with some bottles and things like that. Satisfied with that, I went inside.

But the artifacts kept calling to me. Whispering in my ear "save me!"

Maybe not "Save me!" but at least "Protect me!"

So, after ten minutes of being back in the shop, I went back out and started to sift through the strangely-acrid smelling powder-sand that had been under the structure for 120+ years. Things started to emerge from the dust. First, a little tin facial treatment jar that read "Merry Widow, One Dollar, Tested, Preferred" and then newspaper fragments from 1918, 1934, 1936 and more. A completely intact box of "ButterKist" popcorn going back to 1914 and a "Sunshine Biscuits" box, probably dating from earlier. This building had artifacts that dated its entire period of residing there on Delannoy Avenue.

The find of the day, however, emerged when the lady from the Sandwich Shop came along and helped me look. She pulled from the sand a large piece of linen-type cloth and said "Oh look, old clothing" and stuffed it into my hands. In exchange, she took a ca. 1912 for a "Better Foods Store" in Cocoa.

As these artifacts accumulated, I started to fret. Who owns the property? Will he or she give permission for me to take these off of his property?

So the search was short, but not long. At least, finding out who owned the site was easy:

"Oh, that place?" Said the owner of the building the Antique Mall is located in, upon my inquiry. "That's Troy's. He comes later in the day."

Later in the day meant 4:30ish PM, just before the shop closes and we leave. Argh!

So I fret and worry, but in a good humoured manner. If it worked out











DSCF0027




DSCF0027





Meet 'Petunia'! Petunia is the vintage *working* bandsaw that I picked up in Chicago and hauled the rest of the way to Washington on my trip back from NY. 36" wood-rimmed wheels, 34" throat, and the table is intact! Everything works and is greased and true. Amazing. I jsut need to decide how to power her. She's got a 3-phase electric motor right now, and I don't exactly have a plug for that in my house. I'm thinking 6.5 HP gas motor (evil grin). But anyway, having her in the shed made putting poor Yuko away even more fun!









how to build a wooden table







Related topics:

pedestal for tables

corner kitchen tables with bench

diningroom table plans

antique carved table

console table plan

trunk cocktail tables

wedge end table

rimu coffee table

oak pub table set



tag : how to build a wooden table 30 inch round kitchen

Comments:

Post a comment



Only the blog author may view the comment.

 | BLOG TOP |